Your Average Jo: Questions and Answers

A lot of the questions I was asked at Comms Week were the same ones that I get time and time again. And most of them revolved around social media.
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Your Average Jo: Questions and Answers

A lot of the questions I was asked at Comms Week were the same ones that I get time and time again. And most of them revolved around social media.
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Twitter

Hello! I’m back.

For those who missed my blog (hopefully it’s not just my parents), I disappeared with good reason.

A broken finger (on my dominant hand, of course) taught me a lesson in prioritizing and taking a step back from the computer (and cleaning after dark, but that’s another story).

Yet being away from the computer didn’t stop me from taking part in a great conference held in Toronto in October. Comms Week brought together a group of media folks to talk about the changing landscape in the world of communications. Needless to say, it was a lively discussion. (People who talk and write for a living definitely have a lot to say.)

But what struck me was that when it came time for question period, the questions I was asked were the same ones that I get time and time again. And most of them revolved around social media. This isn’t a bad thing. It shows that many people have the same questions and concerns when it comes to navigating the complex web that is social media. (I’ve griped about it before, so it’s a pain point for me, too.)

For those of you who didn’t make it out to Comms Week, here’s a quick recap of some of those key questions:

Question: What about YouTube?

Answer: What about it? When I was doing strategy consulting I got versions of this question all the time (swap out YouTube for Instagram, Facebook, etc). And I always say the same thing: forget about what you’re doing on YouTube and Instagram or whatever. Take a step back. What’s your objective? Your message? Good content comes first, then figure out how you’ll distribute it. Remember, social media is the medium, not the message.

Q: Does influence still exist?

A: Another way this question is asked, is “do influencers really matter?”.  In my (not always) humble opinion anyone can have influence, it doesn’t only have to be through social media. There is a lot of hype around influencers on social media but with their large followings comes a lot of fluff and noise. It becomes harder and harder to cut through the clutter and credibility has become a real issue. I’m still a fan of one-on-one influencers. You know the people in your day-to-day life: bosses, mentors, trainers, authors and teachers. And you don’t even need good WiFi to benefit from what they’re pushing.

Q: How do you keep from getting spread too thin as an entrepreneur?

A: OK, this isn’t directly related to social media except that it has become another thing on the to-do list.

One of my great influencers/mentors once taught me: “Hire someone to do the $10/hour jobs so that you can focus on the $100/hour jobs.” So whether that is to do my Instagram posts (it’s not), my bookkeeping (best money I spend every month) or walk my dog (except she manages to rock her Insta too: @dogwalksinthesix), I pick my battles and decide what I can do, what I like to do, and what is best to be outsourced.

On that note, I will leave you with the answer I seem to give to almost every question I get when it comes to entrepreneurship (and possibly life): “It takes time, money, or both.” Try to get around that equation. I dare you. There’s no cheating the system when it comes to getting things done well. There are no shortcuts. You either put in the time and effort, or pay the right person to do it for you. 

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